Posts Tagged ‘Ralph Ohr’

Great readings this week

18 de Dezembro de 2010

Enjoy it!

 

10 Open Innovation Questions for SME’s by Stefan Lindegaard

As a follow-up to my slightly provocative blog post, Why Open Innovation is Not for Small Companies, I have begun looking further into the interesting topic on how small companies can innovate with others

How Ideas Take Flight Fred Sheahan

I love this video lecture from Stanford’s Entrepreneurship Corner. Within it, Jennifer Aaker (Twitter: @aaker) explores the importance of happiness, meaning, and story in successful and powerful social media campaigns. I highly recommend spending an hour of your time on this topic; it’s immensely applicable to any business, education, and nonprofit organization with a need to leverage activism and outreach in a networked world.

 

The Path to Outcome-Driven Innovation by Bryan Mahoney

Innovation does not often come along on its own. As Hemingway might have said, there is no one rule to innovating. Sometimes it comes easily and perfectly; sometimes it’s like drilling through rock and blasting it out with charges.

 

Which Ideas Are the Good Ones? By Tim Kastelle

The New York Times has just published The 10th Annual Year in Ideas. As part of this, they asked Tyler Cowen to comment on the previous reviews. He noted this quote from the introduction to the piece:

 

Who’s Really Innovative? By Gary Hamel

If you were compiling a list of the world’s most innovative companies, which businesses would top your list? No one would be surprised if you picked Google, Apple or Amazon, but what about Wal-Mart? (Huh?) Or PG&E (a utility, for crying out loud)? Surely there must be some mistake! Or how ‘bout the Chinese data equipment maker Huawei (umm, who are they)? While a few of these companies might not have made it onto your top 10 list, all of them were featured in Fast Company’s 2010 ranking of innovation all-stars.

 

Leadership vs Management: Tale of the tape by Jorge Barba

After seeing Scott Berkun’s post on innovation vs usability in numbers, I decided to do my own search on Google’s Ngram Viewer and compared four words: innovation, creativity, management and leadership. Graph below or click through to page:

 

Innovation-Inspiring Prizes by Andrea Meyer

Point: Use open innovation challenges and prizes to inspire solutions, participation and collaboration from employees, partners and customers

 

What’s remarkable about innovation by Jeffrey Phillips

Like many of you I participate in the social media world.  That world has opened up new relationships and new sources of information for me that were completely unexpected.  I’ve learned a lot from individuals on Twitter and Facebook and Linkedin, and I’ve become a real believer in the use of social media to support innovation.

 

In Pursuit of the Perfect Brainstorm by David Segal via Ralph-Ohr

Last month, in a small room on the fifth floor of a high-rise building in San Mateo, Calif., three men sat around a table, thinking. The place was wallpapered with Post-it notes, in a riot of colors, plus column after column of index cards pinned to foam boards. Some of the cards had phrases like “space maximizers” or “stuff trackers” written on them.

Have a nice week!

Anúncios

Great readings this week

11 de Dezembro de 2010

Enjoy it!

Beware of Facts & Innovation by Deb Mills-Scofield

Facts & Data.  At Bell Labs we used to say, “How much did you pay for that data?”  Most market research projects – for strategic planning and innovation (my passions), or even incremental product development focus on getting the facts.  Ok, here’s one for you:

 

It Is Hard To Decide Between Getting The “Best” And Getting “Enough”. Muji Thinks “Enough” Is The New “Best”. By Idris Mootee

I am not a superfan of Muji but I am very impressed with their last three years of repositioning or finetuning of the brand and after spending 15 mins in one of their stores in Tokyo I can see why they are doing well. The concept is exporting well to the US too.

Five Ways To Get Smarter On Open Innovation by Stefan Lindegaard

I believe the best way to get smarter and acquire new knowledge on innovation is through articles and blog posts rather than reading books. It is just my experience that it works better both in terms of value and time spent.

 

Asshole Bosses and You: A Cartoon By Team Synchronicity at North Carolina State by Bob Sutton

I just got an email from Scott Bolin, an MBA student at North Carolina State, who worked with his team of fellow MBA’s,  James Wall, My Le, and Bikram Jit Singh, create a funny and well-crafted cartoon called Asshole Bosses and You. 

Cultivating Diversity: a New Way to Network by Mike Brown

Jon Lovitz did a routine on Saturday Night Live about how to be more successful. The answer to success was always the catch phrase, “Get to know me!” Looking back on my first year of leaving the corporate world for entrepreneurship in the world of strategy and innovation, the success we’ve had has been linked

 

Want Your Customers To Talk Sizzle Or Steak? By Wim Rampen

Customers have jobs to do. And so do Companies. In essence the trick is to align and focus the company’s activities to maximize support to Customers to get their jobs done. From the unpredictable Customer’s decision journey through each stage of the life-cycle. And make money as a result of it.

 

The Magic of Intuition at Work by Alex Pattakos via Ralph-Ohr

 

Sometimes we wish that we had the magical powers of the lovable witch Samantha Stephens in the situation comedy Bewitched; at the time (1960s and 1970s) it was the highest rated television series ever for the ABC network.

Balance innovation and continuous improvement by Jorge Barba

All of us know that if you we want to make sweeping changes, we need to innovate. If done incrementally (in small improvements), it won’t attract much attention. FedEx became a success story as they changed people’s expectations (absolutely, positively overnight) of delivery services, delivered on their promise and charged a premium for it.  However, innovation projects are never “complete”.

Have a nice week!

Great readings this week!

5 de Dezembro de 2010

Enjoy this readings!

 

Innovate By Hacking Capabilities by Saul Kaplan

Capabilities are the amino acids of innovation.  They are the building blocks that enable value delivery.  Innovation is a better way to deliver value and is often the result of repurposing existing capabilities.

 

Harnessing Ignorance to Spark Creativity by Bob Sutton via Ralph-Ohr

I just got an email from a writer who was checking to see if I had argued — in a talk long ago — that true innovations come from people who ignore customers.

Passion and Wisdom by John Hagel

Passion and wisdom. Youth and age.  Most of us would say that these are two ends of the spectrum.  Many say that one can either be passionate or wise, but not both.  Passion typically prevails in one’s youth while wisdom gains prominence with age and experience.

 

The Opposition Strategy by Jorge Barba

One great way to stand out and differentiate is to do the opposite of what everyone else is doing. An opposition strategy is usually the result of challenging long held assumptions of how things are done, this is the domain of us ‘crazies’ who question authority.

 

The Role of Strategy by Tim Kastelle

There is a terrific quote in Creative Disruption by Simon Waldman about strategy. It is from Markus Reckling, the Managing Director of Corporate Development for Deutsche Post – here’s the quote plus Waldman’s interpretation:

 

This Is Your Brain on Metaphors by ROBERT SAPOLSKY via Riita Raesmaa

Despite rumors to the contrary, there are many ways in which the human brain isn’t all that fancy. Let’s compare it to the nervous system of a fruit fly. Both are made up of cells, of course, with neurons playing particularly important roles.

Great Advice on Open Innovation from Intuit by Stefan Lindegaard

A few weeks back, I wrote a blog post, From Archer to Magnet: A Good Goal for Open Innovation, which was based on a recent meeting with Jan Bosch, VP of Open Innovation at Intuit.

Have a nice week!

Great readings this week!

27 de Novembro de 2010

Enjoy it!

 

Making Room for Reflection Is a Strategic Imperative by Umair Haque via @ralph_ohr

Business is, above all, busy. And maybe it’s too busy.

Let’s face it. Most of us spend most of our time chasing the immediate reward, the short-run “objective,” the near-term “goal — in short, the expedient and the convenient.

Innovation – Doing the Impossible with No Resources by Jeffrey Phillips

During this most recent downturn, but similarly to other downturns, at least while I’ve been in the workforce, is the concept of “doing more with less” – that is, wringing more output or benefits out of the same, or often even less, inputs and resources

Currency of 21st Century Business? Connections by Deb Mills-Scofield

Sitting behind me at BIF-6 was this nice, unassuming guy.  We struck up a conversation.  As a result, a wonderful friendship has developed (which is easy to do at BIF). This guy was Michael Lee Stallard.

The Mindset and Key Skills Needed for Successful Innovation by Stefan Lindegaard

In my talks, I like to get into discussions on why we need to update our mindset and key skills in order to become successful at innovation. Below, I have given a couple of reasons as well as some suggestions on the key skills we need to develop.

Is Innovation Expensive? By Paul Sloane

How can companies afford to allocate scarce resources to innovation in these unprecedented times. When every extraneous expenditure is cut back to preserve cash flow how can it be justified to lavish money on

 

The Innovation Matrix: People or Tools? By Tim Kastelle

I had lunch last week with some managers from a company that is trying to improve their innovation performance. They kept asking me what tools should they be using to do this? Is there software that will help, or a process, or some other tool? I had to explain that there are a lot of tools available, but that first you have to figure out your innovation strengths and weaknesses.

The Two Dimensions of Market Orientation by Ralph Christian Ohr

Recently, I was reading an interesting HBR article, named: “Meeting the Apple Game of Customer Perception” by Ndubuisi Ekekwe.

The key paragraphs for me were:

How Are You Smart for Innovation Era? By Ellen Weber

The new innovation era builds on different talents – those overlooked by exclusive practices that limit  wealth for grabbers at the top.

Have a nice week!

10.10.10 and 01.01.01 Good readings !!

10 de Outubro de 2010

In 01/01/2001

Welcome to the 2001 Weblog Awards™. I’m Nikolai Nolan, and I’ll be your host for this month.

The Bloggies ™ are publicly-chosen Weblog Awards Given to Those related to writers and weblogs in 30 categories. And not much more introduction is necessary. Here are the rules:

 

Best article or essay about weblogs

What the Hell Is a Weblog? And why leave me alone Will not They? By Derek M. Powazek

I fell in love with the web to long time in August It entered my bloodstream Like a virus, took root, and changed my life forever. And, Almost Immediately, the virus spread to HAD.

I made piles of homepages, the oldest of Which are lost forever in the digital ether. I did my college thesis online. I got a job in the biz. I started with lofty goals vague projects like “doing it right.” I cared too much.

And You Can read today 10/10/10:

Modernizers, preservationists and Innovation by Tim Kastelle

Adam Thierer wrote a terrific post today exploring his theme optimists and pessimists major ongoing Comparing Internet. Has he written a very interesting series of posts Assessing the arguments of the pessimists That Think That the impact of the Internet on society is Generally bad (eg Nick Carr, Andrew Keen, Jaron Lanier), and the optimists think That That the Internet is transformational , and positive (eg, Clay Shirky, Kevin Kelly, all the guys Cluetrain Manifesto).

How to fight the confirmation bias by Jorge Barba

Aha! you got an idea and you want to add the research to know if you’re idea has wings. You set up google alerts, hashtags on twitter about related topics, follow people in the know, join related groups on Linkedin, etc.. .. You know the drill!

The future of open innovation by Oliver Gassmann, Ellen Enkel & Henry Chesbrough via @ ralph_ohr

Institutional openness is becoming Increasingly popular in practice and academia: open innovation, open R & D, and open business models. This special issue builds on the concepts, underlying Assumptions and Implications discussed in two previous R & D Management Special Issue (2006, 2009).

The Power Of Storytelling by chrisbrogan via @ Ariegoldshlager

Storytelling is the most powerful way to put ideas into the world today.
-Robert McKee

Innovation by Measure Outcomes Saul Kaplan

If Boston, NYC, San Francisco and are the top three U.S. cities of Their Economic why innovation, education, health care, energy systems and produce the results the Same Poor cities around the rest of the country?

Return on Failure: The Equation by Deb Mills-Scofield

What is failure? When things go According to the plan or not expectations, ending up with unexpected and / or undesired outcomes (Which We Can argue Could Have Been avoidable, or not). The key is ‘undesired’ – because if They Were not desired or expected and planned, That would still be great! But the Will we see, failure is a terrific way to learn. Maybe We Could measure the Return on Learning Failure: ROF.

 

What makes a great-capable Innovation Culture? By Drew CM

The part of Our ongoing research into how Organizations are building innovation-capable cultures, Primed Associates is conducting a new survey on the drivers of innovation culture. This survey Will Assess the current state of an organization’s support for processes, systems and behaviors That Influence ITS culture of innovation.

Mood and the Impact of Memorable Experiences by Mike Brown

Yesterday’s video with innovation gurus Stone Payton and Todd Schnick was shot last Wednesday night at # InnobeerATL to get together planned for the original # Innochat innovation guys along with friends from Atlanta and some of the AMA Marketing Research Conference and social media team.

Another Selection of good readings – M version

12 de Setembro de 2010

I think reading is fun!

Enjoy it!

The Power of Co-Creation by Terry Kosdrosky via @ariegoldshlager

A Q&A with marketing professor Venkat Ramaswamy.

The traditional goods-and-services model of business is getting a makeover. Shoe companies, fashion houses — even cement companies — increasingly are engaged with customers, suppliers, and other stakeholders in a quest to co-create value.

 

Prepare for the unexpected by Jorge Barba

Imagine that you are a pilot and you have to fly through a 5 mile canyon upside down. It’s actually kind of hard to imagine because it’s not something you’re trained to do but it’s something that could happen in a real life situation.

 

Innovation and Porter’s Value Chain by Jeffrey Phillips via @ralph_ohr

I’m reviewing the relationship between a number of tried and true strategic management models and innovation, to see if those models and concepts hold up under the increasing importance of innovation.

 

Great Quotes on Open Innovation by Psion by Stefan Lindegaard

I just went through the tweets from our recent Twitter Chat with the executives from Psion and I found some great quotes worth sharing.

Seek Conflicting Views to Improve Innovation by Tim Kastelle

Innovation occurs when we creatively connect ideas in new and novel ways. If we are trying to differentiate ourselves, or our organisation, we need to be able to do this well. One way to approach this is to consciously seek out viewpoints and information that we normally wouldn’t encounter, or which conflict with our normal world view.

There Is One Thing That Is In Common Between Apple And China. Both Are Unstoppable And Locomotives Of Innovation For The Future. By Idris Mootee

It is so fascinating that everywhere I go in China this week, people are trying to sell me the Chinese versions of iPhone, iPad and other iThings that Apple has yet invented.

Sex and Smart Phones by Dan Ariely

Popular online dating site OkCupid recently released some numbers users reported regarding their sex lives. One interesting correlation was between smart phone usage and number of sexual partners. As you see below, women iPhone users (at the age of 30) report having had 12.3 sexual partners, over twice as many as women Android users. Male smart phone users show a similar jump: from 6.0 sexual partners on Android to 10 on the iPhone. Blackberry users fall almost exactly in the middle.

Bad Is Stronger Than Good: Why Good Bosses Eliminate the Negative First by Bob Sutton

Of all the tunes in the Johnny Mercer songbook, the most generally beloved must be “Accentuate the Positive” — whether your favorite cover is Bing Crosby’s, Willie Nelson’s, or someone else’s.

Stories Can Change the World by Saul  Kaplan

“Facts are facts, but stories are who we are, how we learn, and what it all means.”  My friend Alan Webber, Co-founder of Fast Company and author of Rules of Thumb, has it exactly right. 

Have a nice week

The Future of Innovation – Time to predict and time to design

7 de Setembro de 2010

(Texto em Português depois deste)

Do you believe in innovation?

Ralph-Ohr sent to me an article via Twitter, where Robert Bain, at a certain point of the interview, asks Andy Budd (founding partner of design agency Clearleft) this:

So you believe that innovation has to occur naturally?

– “I think it’s something you can set up an ecosystem to encourage. Obviously hiring smart people, giving enough investment, giving people time and space to play and explore is definitely a way of investing in this idea of innovation, but you have to understand innovation is a long-term thing….

So what you often find is that the innovators are the ones who create the technology, but it takes a designer to understand the impact of that innovation and package it in a way that users actually want. ”

I agree that the concept of innovation should be viewed as a long term thing and that during this time will be room to a combination of “true” innovations in order to a “desired innovation” becomes the success we have seen with some products.

But I also believe we judge ourselves by our intentions, and we judge others by their behaviors.

To that extent what the users want is what we seek to create and add (much) value.

For the companies value means a return on investment (capital) that arrives after a long period, but for the users should mean (the feeling of usefulness and usability) an investment for the future after the acquisition. It is not always so!

What people want is not always what people need!

For companies that want to be “Number One “, this distinction does not matter and as Budd warns that race is often a bad move.

That long term is referred to the time required to understand and integrate connections that represent the hidden or unconscious needs of consumers or users.

As stated by Budd on “rather than understanding the demographics we need to understand psychographics.”

Knowing people’s opinion does not seem the most appropriate approach to develop a product that can be both innovative and responsive to genuine need. The manipulation of opinion is not very difficult to achieve. This does not mean that people should give up their tastes or trends or should fail to conform with the ecosystem where they live.

It means that research to identify needs must be done, not by GPS, as Deepa Prahalad says, but by a compass that gives us the direction, allows identifying opportunities and giving at the same time the possibility of different approaches.

There is a “mystical part” in consumer behavior that is supported by some research showing that the vast majority of the buying decision is made on an emotional basis and experts estimate that up 95 % of purchase behavior is rooted in the subconscious level.

But the “Innovation has a sort of mysticism about it, almost like a magic formula. I actually think good design is 99% perspiration, it’s a lot of hard work. There is a process, there’s a series of steps you can take that start with research and end with well-designed products that meet the needs of the users”, says Budd.

Hence the need for a search through the observation of people in their environments in order to give people the products they are missing.

Make projections of what will be the drivers and motivations, of people in the future allows seeing things that people still do not see, seems to be essential for innovation.

But organizations also need to occupy a good deal of time designing good products that will satisfy those future needs.

 

O futuro em Inovação – Tempo para prever e tempo para desenhar

Acredita em inovação?

Num artigo, que Ralph-ohr me indicou via Twitter, Robert Bain, a determinada altura da entrevista, pergunta a Andy Budd (sócio fundador da agência de design Clearleft) o seguinte: 

Então acredita que a inovação tem de ocorrer naturalmente?

– “Eu acho que é algo onde se pode criar um ecossistema para incentivar. Obviamente, a contratação de pessoas inteligentes, dando investimento suficiente, dando às pessoas tempo e espaço para brincar e explorar é definitivamente uma maneira de investir nessa ideia de inovação, mas é preciso entender que a inovação é uma coisa de longo prazo…

Então o que você encontrará muitas vezes é que os inovadores são aqueles que criam a tecnologia, mas é preciso um designer entender o impacto dessa inovação e empacotá-lo de uma forma que os usuários realmente querem.”

Eu concordo que a concepção de inovação deve ser vista como uma coisa a longo prazo e que nesse tempo terá de haver lugar à combinação de “verdadeiras” inovações para que a “inovação desejada” seja o sucesso a que assistimos com alguns produtos.

Mas eu também acredito que nós nos julgamos a nós próprios pelas nossas intenções, e julgamos os outros pelos seus comportamentos.

Nesta medida aquilo que os usuários querem é aquilo que nos procuramos criar e acrescentar (muito) valor.

Por parte das empresas este valor significa um retorno do investimento (capital) que chega depois de um prazo longo, mas por parte dos usuários deveria significar (sentimento de utilidade e usabilidade) um investimento para o futuro após a aquisição. Nem sempre é assim!

Aquilo que as pessoas querem nem sempre é aquilo que as pessoas precisam!

Para as empresas que querem ser “Número Um”, esta diferenciação não interessa e como adverte Budd essa corrida é muitas vezes uma má jogada.

Aquele longo prazo referido é o tempo necessário, para compreender e integrar conexões que representam as necessidades ocultas ou não conscientes dos consumidores ou usuários.

Como refere Budd em “vez de compreender a demografia, precisamos entender psicografia.”

Saber a opinião das pessoas não parece ser a atitude mais correcta para desenvolver um produto que possa ser simultaneamente inovador e responda a uma necessidade real. A manipulação de opinião não é muito difícil de conseguir. Isto não significa que as pessoas devam abdicar dos seus gostos ou tendências ou devam deixar de estar em conformidade com o ecossistema onde estão inseridos.

Significa que a pesquisa para identificar as necessidades, deve ser feita, não através de GPS, como diz Deepa Prahalad, mas através de uma bússola que nos dê a direcção, permitindo identificar oportunidades e dando ao mesmo tempo a possibilidade de realizar diferentes abordagens.

Existe uma “parte mística” no comportamento do consumidor que é suportada por alguma pesquisa que revela que a grande maioria das decisões de compra são feitas numa base emocional, e os especialistas calculam que até 95 % do comportamento de compra tem origem no nível subconsciente.

Mas a “a inovação tem um tipo de misticismo sobre o assunto, quase como uma fórmula mágica. Eu realmente acho que um bom design é 99% transpiração, é muito trabalho duro. Há um processo, há uma série de passos que você pode ter que começar com a pesquisa e termina com produtos bem concebidos que atendem às necessidades dos usuários”, diz Budd.

Daí a necessidade de aplicar uma pesquisa através da observação das pessoas nos seus ambientes, para poder dar às pessoas os produtos que lhes fazem falta.

Fazer projecções de quais serão os condutores e as motivações das pessoas no futuro permitirá ver as coisas que as pessoas ainda não vêem, parece ser fundamental para a inovação.

Mas as organizações também precisam de ocupar uma boa parte do seu tempo a desenhar bem os produtos que vão satisfazer essas futuras necessidades.

 

“A Great Source of Inspiration” – Some readings this week!

28 de Agosto de 2010

What do you think about this…?

 

Dissonant Design by Stuart Hogue

In the Upper East and West Sides, the West Village, and Brooklyn Heights – some of the New York City neighborhoods where well-off new parents reside – Bugaboo strollers are pervasive

Are You Innovation Ready? by Soumitra Dutta via Ralph-Ohr

Collaborative innovation will be key for success in the future. Corporate leaders realise that they need to work collaboratively with their business partners, customers and governments to innovate successfully for the future. Innovation ecosystems that span across public and private sectors and extend to include citizens and societies have to be formed. Collaborative innovation is the name of the game for future success.

Changing the rules of innovation by radically innovating what things mean by Roberto Verganti

The etymology of the word design goes back to the Latin ‘designare’ which means to designate, to give meaning to things… Design is not about styling. It’s not about technology. It’s about radical change in meaning. These are things that people were not asking for, but when they saw them, they fell in love.

Three Ways to Fail at Innovation by Tim Kastelle

Three blog posts that caught my eye this week demonstrate three different ways that you can fail at innovation:

  • Ignore the small innovations: James Todhunter wrote an excellent post yesterday defending thinking about improvements as innovation. You should read the whole post, but here is a highlight:

 

The Innovation gap between Executives and their teams by Jeffrey Phillips

It strikes me regularly that senior executives of many firms underestimate the insights and abilities of their companies.  I guess that many of us grow up with a backward-looking preference.

 

Interactions: A Great Source of Inspiration for Thought Leaders by Stefan Lindegaard

Your blog is up and running and you are so ready to share your thoughts and ideas with others. The first blog posts come out nicely as you can simply tap into your notes and mental drawer and write about issues that you have been wondering about for a long time.

 

In Innovation, Culture Trumps! Learnings from P&G by Deb Mills-Scofield

Quick – what company do you think of when you hear “Open Innovation”? Many think of P&G – they were, and are, at the forefront of Open Innovation (OI) and the results are now case studies at business schools around the world and benchmarks for many.

Innovating your business model by Jorge Barba

Competition in industries is essentially competition between business models. A recent  tweet by @TimKastelle which led to a post about the evolution of the business model concept reminded me of a great creative exercise to help you look at your and other industries dominant business model as a lego kit, which when broken apart can be reconnected like building blocks to create new types of business concepts.

Six Keys to Being Excellent at Anything by Tony Schwartz

I’ve been playing tennis for nearly five decades. I love the game and I hit the ball well, but I’m far from the player I wish I were.

Are you looking for some great readings? You just found it!

21 de Agosto de 2010

Enjoy this!

Who is an Ethnographer? by Idris Mootee

Ethnography is hot. Many are quick to claim that they do ethnography by observing people. It is like saying anyone who drives a taxi in NY is a screenwriter. Or anyone who knows how to operate a camera can be a photojournalist

Apple iPad and Google Buzz: Harsh Reality of Innovation by Hutch Carpenter

Nothing like putting your heart and soul in an innovation, and then getting this:

Innovation tip – look for remote as well as local opportunities by Paul Sloane

Most businesses look for new opportunities in obvious places, adjacent to their current position. They typically ask two questions:

Innovation Case: Creating A World Class Innovation Unit by Stefan Lindegaard

A global and well-respected company in a fast-growing industry wants to set up a new innovation unit. Their current innovation efforts are technology-driven but there is a growing understanding that innovation efforts need to focus beyond technology and R&D.

The Golden Age of Innovation – Newsweek via Ralph-Ohr

Despite stereotypes of entrepreneurs as fresh-faced youngsters, new research has found that older workers are more likely to innovate than their under-35 counterparts.

Leadership from the Inside Out — Part II by Gary Hamel

In my previous post, I introduced you to Drew Williams. For seven years Drew served as assistant vicar at St. Andrews, an Anglican parish in Chorleywood, England. When he arrived in 2003, Drew found a church that was big but not growing, and a congregation that was loyal but not energized. Mark Stibbe, head vicar at St. Andrews, challenged Drew to develop a plan that would change this.

Watch the disruptors, not the incumbents by by Tom Hulme

If you want to turn a competitor’s advantage into a weakness, start by widening your sources of inspiration

Needs-Based Innovation Reigns Businessweek via Jorge Barba

Companies should adopt an innovation process based on customer needs rather than coming up with “big” ideas and then testing them out. Pro or con?

Ten More Great Free e-Books for Innovators by Tim Kastelle

On Christmas Day last year, I posted a list of ten great free e-books for innovators. Today isn’t as festive, but I have another ten great free e-books that can help you become more innovative. Connecting ideas is the fundamental creative act in innovation, and one of the ways to do this is to read widely in order to gain exposure to a wide variety of ideas. This is a list of great resources that will help you do precisely that.

Have a nice week!

Great readings this week!!

14 de Agosto de 2010

Some good things to read!

How to Build Cooperation by Greg Satell

Can’t we all just get along?

No we can’t.  Not if we think we can win by screwing over the other guy.  We are all predators by nature (some of us more than others) and we do what we must in order to survive.

True Leaders Are Also Managers by Robert I. Sutton

Ever have occasion to do an in-depth review of the academic and practical literature on leadership? I have — twice in the past five years

 

Openness or How Do You Design for the Loss of Control? By Tim Leberecht via Ralph-Ohr

Openness is the mega-trend for innovation in the 21st century, and it remains the topic du jour for businesses of all kinds. Granted, it has been on the agenda of every executive ever since Henry Chesbrough’s seminal Open Innovation came out in 2003.

Which Part of Your Business Model is Creating Value? By Tim Kastelle

Andrew Keen posted a fascinating interview with Jeff Jarvis yesterday. All of the interview clips are worth watching – they touch on a number of interesting topics, including the relative benefits of publicness and privacy, the future of news and how to best develop new business models for journalism, why google struggles with social applications, and the changing nature of internet-based business models. The latter is included in this clip:

Strategy starts with identifying changes by Jorge Barba

Pay attention to this McKinsey Quarterly interview of Richard Rumelt, professor of strategy at UCLA’s Anderson School of Management:

Smartfailing – a new concept for learning through failure by Stefan Lindegaard

We need to become better at learning through failure, but the word failure itself is so negatively loaded. How can we create a new concept and vocabulary on the intersection of failure and learning?

The efficient use of ideas by Jeffrey Phillips

Every significant “leap forward” in the span of human consciousness has coincided with a significant change in the efficient use of a significant resource.  For example – the transition from nomadic life to farming.

Ideas Jam – How it works by Paul Sloane

We ran the Ideas Jam meeting yesterday and it went well. It was an intensive idea generation session.

Creativity Matters by John Maeda

Last month when Newsweek [07.19.10] ran a piece on how to fix the “Creativity Crisis” in America, the mainstream media brought to light critical issues that are routinely ignored in the U.S. today

How to Find Opportunities in Fragmentation by Andrea Meyer

Point: If you’re looking for a new business opportunity, look for individually-fragmented but collectively large areas of economic activity, such as where individuals or small business own a large segment of the market

Enjoy it!