Posts Tagged ‘Andrea Meyer’

Great readings this week

18 de Dezembro de 2010

Enjoy it!

 

10 Open Innovation Questions for SME’s by Stefan Lindegaard

As a follow-up to my slightly provocative blog post, Why Open Innovation is Not for Small Companies, I have begun looking further into the interesting topic on how small companies can innovate with others

How Ideas Take Flight Fred Sheahan

I love this video lecture from Stanford’s Entrepreneurship Corner. Within it, Jennifer Aaker (Twitter: @aaker) explores the importance of happiness, meaning, and story in successful and powerful social media campaigns. I highly recommend spending an hour of your time on this topic; it’s immensely applicable to any business, education, and nonprofit organization with a need to leverage activism and outreach in a networked world.

 

The Path to Outcome-Driven Innovation by Bryan Mahoney

Innovation does not often come along on its own. As Hemingway might have said, there is no one rule to innovating. Sometimes it comes easily and perfectly; sometimes it’s like drilling through rock and blasting it out with charges.

 

Which Ideas Are the Good Ones? By Tim Kastelle

The New York Times has just published The 10th Annual Year in Ideas. As part of this, they asked Tyler Cowen to comment on the previous reviews. He noted this quote from the introduction to the piece:

 

Who’s Really Innovative? By Gary Hamel

If you were compiling a list of the world’s most innovative companies, which businesses would top your list? No one would be surprised if you picked Google, Apple or Amazon, but what about Wal-Mart? (Huh?) Or PG&E (a utility, for crying out loud)? Surely there must be some mistake! Or how ‘bout the Chinese data equipment maker Huawei (umm, who are they)? While a few of these companies might not have made it onto your top 10 list, all of them were featured in Fast Company’s 2010 ranking of innovation all-stars.

 

Leadership vs Management: Tale of the tape by Jorge Barba

After seeing Scott Berkun’s post on innovation vs usability in numbers, I decided to do my own search on Google’s Ngram Viewer and compared four words: innovation, creativity, management and leadership. Graph below or click through to page:

 

Innovation-Inspiring Prizes by Andrea Meyer

Point: Use open innovation challenges and prizes to inspire solutions, participation and collaboration from employees, partners and customers

 

What’s remarkable about innovation by Jeffrey Phillips

Like many of you I participate in the social media world.  That world has opened up new relationships and new sources of information for me that were completely unexpected.  I’ve learned a lot from individuals on Twitter and Facebook and Linkedin, and I’ve become a real believer in the use of social media to support innovation.

 

In Pursuit of the Perfect Brainstorm by David Segal via Ralph-Ohr

Last month, in a small room on the fifth floor of a high-rise building in San Mateo, Calif., three men sat around a table, thinking. The place was wallpapered with Post-it notes, in a riot of colors, plus column after column of index cards pinned to foam boards. Some of the cards had phrases like “space maximizers” or “stuff trackers” written on them.

Have a nice week!

Great readings this week!

7 de Novembro de 2010

 

Enjoy it!

 

Designing for the Future Customer With Foresight Thinking by Bernhard Schindlholzer

Many organizations make the common mistake of designing a future product or service for today’s user. The user today will not be the same user you want to target in two or three product cycles.

Innovators Go It Alone by Ndubuisi Ekekwe Via @ariegoldshlager 

For a long time, Ford, Chrysler, and GM followed the same strategy: they built big gas-guzzlers. Asian competitors attacked that model, took market share, and transformed the U.S. automobile industry.

 

Collaboration and Co-creation: Incentives Are Important by Gaurav Bhalla Via @ralph_ohr

Customer collaboration and co-creation rests on a few key assumptions; that customers are passionate about the collaboration objective(s), and are willing and able to offer their time and creativity.

 

Open Innovation and Open Source: What They Share and How They Differ by Stefan Lindegaard

Based on the positive feedback from this webcast, we followed up with a conversation with regular opensource.com contributor Chris Grams and myself on the ways open source and open innovation are different and the things they share.

Relational Knowledge – We discover what we know in our relations by Daniel Durrant

Might our knowledge increase as we extend our relations further through structured learning networks? Relational knowledge transcends my brain and your brain, I can tell you that much. It is the relational space of reflection that I believe will take us to the next level: greater challenges, greater opportunities

Open Innovation Measurement – Part 3: Mass Customization by Volker Bilgram

Research on mass customization has examined the value accrued by co-creation in a stage of the value chain very close to commercialization.

Northrop Grumman, Eastman Chemical: Where to Innovate in this Economy by Andrea Meyer

Story: At Invention Machine’s Power to Innovate user conference, Jim Belfiore, Senior Director of Client Innovation and Practices, posed the question of where to innovate in this economy. Numerous presenters provided varied and surprising answers about where they find innovation and innovation-related opportunities.

Have a nice week

 

Great readings this week!

26 de Setembro de 2010

Enjoy it!

 

Innovation and Human Capabilities by Ralph-Christian Ohr

John Steen wrote a series of  posts on why experts and crowds usually miss disruptive innovation and how to use networks to tap expertise and knowledge. I’d like to expand these thoughts a bit more towards the question: what’s the role of human capabilities in innovation? For elaboration, I’m going to combine two concepts I’ve recently come across:

Has Google jumped the innovation shark? by Jeffrey Phillips

I was thinking recently, with the demise of Google Wave, that it is entirely possible that Google has jumped the innovation shark.  For those of you unfamiliar with the “jumped the shark” phrase, that harkens to a famous television show in the US.

Innovation. What Gives ? by Jorge Barba

Spotted this  tweet a few minutes ago : # Innovation is rare. : millions of cookbooks Sold and read all with Practically The Same recipes. What Gives ?

Large-scale Solutions without Large-scale Organizations – #BIF6 by Andrea Meyer

Instead of trying to change large organizations, we can create new human-scale organizations that embody the needed changes and inspire passion. Micro-volunteering site Sparked.org, citizen site SeeClickFix and Fabien Cousteau’s PlantaFish point the way.

Don’t Let Others Steal Your Ideas, Another Cool Idea by Stefan Lindegaard

I recently learned about two cool projects on the intersection of open innovation, IPR and ideas. They are still in the early stages, but I think they have some potential and if you work on this intersection, you should definitely check them out.

 

Is It Time to Rethink the T-Shaped Designer? by Kevin McCullagh 

At the recent DMI conference in London, Geoff Mulgan, once Tony Blair’s ex-strategy advisor and now a leading social entrepreneur, politely explained how ‘social designers’ had ‘entered his space’… and failed.

The Collaborative Organization: How to Make Employee Networks Really Work by Rob Cross, Peter Gray, Shirley Cunningham, Mark Showers and Robert J. Thomas

As information technology becomes increasingly critical within large, global organizations, chief information officers are being held to ever-higher performance standards.

So What Is Going On In Open Innovation In 2010? By Roland Harwood

Here at AngelNews we are convinced that a major platform for economic recovery will come from sustained engagement between very large corporates and their SME siblings.

Interaction Design Has An Important Role To Play In Our Future, It Has The Power To Transform Cultures by Idris Mootee

There is two articles on IC today, one on Inc. magazine and the other in Globe and Mail. We’re getting some good press coverage and we need to continue to make our story heard.

 

Boss Poop: A Morality Tale From Author Jonathan Littman by Bob Sutton

I have talked about author Jon Littman here before, as he has written a lot of books.  He co-authored gems including The Art of Innovation, Ten Faces of Innovation, and most recently “I Hate People.”

Designing Effective Open Innovation Programs by Arie Goldshlager

1)Design Open Innovation Processes that facilitate long-term trust-based relationships

Have a nice week!

The open innovation and knowledge transfer

22 de Setembro de 2010

(Texto em Português depois deste)

Communication and trust

Open Innovation brings measurable results for those who embraced it with lower costs than traditional methods.

Open Innovation is” the use of inputs and outputs for purposes of knowledge to accelerate internal innovation, and expand markets for external use of innovation, respectively. [This paradigm] assumes that companies can and should use external ideas, as well as internal ideas, and internal and external paths to market, as they look to advance their technology.”- Henry Chesbrough

Open Innovation is hard! Ask different skills and ability to face new challenges.

Open Innovation requires discipline, and try to draw the right choices, to engage in new skills and tools, as well as process all of this without losing the desired pace .  

Open Innovation brings speed in placing products or services on the market.

Open Innovation can reduce risk when making decisions, it presents more and better alternatives.

Open Innovation promotes interdisciplinary actions and this increases the brand value.

Open Innovation enables collaboration with universities, reducing the cracks between them and the organizations.

Take the example of Deutsche Telekom:

“Consistent application of the logic of open innovation leads to the inclusion of the client. Open Innovation helps open the borders of the company, promoting cooperation and integration know-how of foreign brokers to meet the most demanding requirements of the innovation ecosystem. In addition to subsidiaries, suppliers, competitors, consultants, and private and public research institutions, first, the client plays a decisive role (Eurostat 2007).

Customers are equal partners in development processes of Deutsche Telekom as part of a coherent approach to open innovation. The four methods of integrating the customer – Lead user method, a contest of ideas, virtual communities, and “toolkits for innovation”- are based on theoretical principles and are exemplary in integrating the user’s approach to open innovation.”

Open innovation provides an overview of how companies can benefit from external sources of knowledge.

But open innovation also brings other challenges such as finding partners for innovation as they are clearly listed by Stefan Lindegaard on ” Top 10 Challenges in Finding Innovation Partners

As a process of knowledge transfer everything depends on the absorption capacity. The difference in ability explains many times, because an organization has more success than others.

The absorption capacity, and openness to the outside (Open Innovation) are closely related, and that connection is often characterized by fears of leakage of information or other type of insecurity.

We know that similar situations happen at any time and anywhere, so it is important to discipline when an organization embraces open innovation.

Andrea Meyer in his blog Working Knowledge  writes “Stefan Lindegaard, author of the The Open Innovation Revolution , and Greg Fox, Senior Director & CMO – Strategic Alliances at Cisco, held an invitation-only Think Tank group at the Summit to identify and discuss the key qualities of leaders of open innovation.  The group ranked communications in the top three characteristics (vision and adaptability were also key).  The Think Tank group emphasized the importance of leaders using a deliberate communications strategy with holistic internal and external communication.  Good open innovation leaders have the confidence to share what they know but also maintain proper disclosure limits with open innovation partners.”

Good leaders should read:

 

A inovação aberta e a transferência de conhecimento

Comunicação e confiança

A Inovação Aberta, traz resultados mensuráveis para quem a abraça com custos mais baixos do que os métodos tradicionais.

“Inovação aberta “ é “a utilização das entradas e saídas de propósitos de conhecimento para acelerar a inovação interna, e ampliar os mercados, para o uso externo das inovações, respectivamente. [Este paradigma] pressupõe que as empresas podem e devem usar ideias externas, assim como ideias internas, e caminhos internos e externos para o mercado, como olham para o avanço da sua tecnologia. ” – Henry Chesbrough

A Inovação Aberta, é dura! Pede competências diferentes e habilidade para enfrentar novos desafios.

A Inovação aberta, requer disciplina, para desenhar e experimentar as opções certas, para se envolver em novas competências e, ferramentas, bem como, processar tudo isso, não perdendo o ritmo desejado.  

A Inovação Aberta, traz velocidade na colocação de produtos ou serviços no mercado.

A Inovação Aberta, pode reduzir riscos, ao tomar decisões, pois apresenta mais e melhores alternativas.

A Inovação aberta, promove a interdisciplinaridade e isso aumenta o valor da marca.

A Inovação Aberta, permite uma colaboração com as universidades, reduzindo as fissuras existentes entre estas e as organizações.

Vejamos o exemplo da Deutsche Telekom:

“A aplicação consistente da lógica de inovação aberta conduz à inclusão do cliente. Inovação aberta ajuda a abrir as fronteiras da empresa, promovendo a cooperação e integração de know-how externo de correctores para cumprir os requisitos mais exigentes do ecossistema de inovação. Além de filiais, fornecedores, concorrentes, consultores, bem como privadas e instituições públicas de pesquisa, em primeiro lugar, o cliente desempenha um papel decisivo (Eurostat 2007).

Os clientes são parceiros iguais nos processos de desenvolvimento da Deutsche Telekom, como parte de uma abordagem coerente da inovação aberta. Os quatro métodos de integração do cliente – método de usuário chumbo, concurso de ideias, comunidades virtuais, e “kits de ferramentas para a inovação” – são baseadas em princípios teóricos e são exemplares para a integração do usuário na abordagem de inovação aberta.”

A abertura na inovação fornece uma visão geral de como as empresas podem beneficiar a partir de fontes externas de conhecimento.

Mas a inovação aberta também traz outro tipo de desafios como o encontrar parceiros de inovação como claramente são referidos por Stefan Lindegaard em “ Top 10 Challenges in Finding Innovation Partners

Como num processo de transferência de conhecimento tudo depende da capacidade de absorção. A diferença de capacidade explica muitas vezes, porque uma organização tem mais sucesso, do que outra.

A capacidade de absorção, e a abertura ao exterior (inovação aberta) estão intimamente ligadas e, essa ligação é caracterizada frequentemente por receios de fuga de informação ou de outro tipo de insegurança.

Nós sabemos que situações análogas acontecem em qualquer momento e em qualquer lugar, por isso é importante a disciplina quando se uma organização abraça a inovação aberta.

Andrea Meyer no seu blog Working Knowledge  “Stefan Lindegaard, autor do A Revolução Open Innovation eE Fox Greg, Director Sénior e CMO – Alianças Estratégicas em Cisco, acolheram um grupo Think Tank , só por convite, na Cimeira para identificar e discutir as principais qualidades dos líderes de inovação aberta . O grupo classificou as comunicações no topo três características (visão e capacidade de adaptação também foram chave). O grupo Think Tank ressaltou a importância de os líderes usarem uma estratégia deliberada de comunicação holística interna e externa.

Bons líderes de inovação aberta têm a confiança de partilhar o que sabem, mas também manter os limites de divulgação adequada com os parceiros de inovação aberta.”

Bons líderes devem ler:

Great readings this week!!

14 de Agosto de 2010

Some good things to read!

How to Build Cooperation by Greg Satell

Can’t we all just get along?

No we can’t.  Not if we think we can win by screwing over the other guy.  We are all predators by nature (some of us more than others) and we do what we must in order to survive.

True Leaders Are Also Managers by Robert I. Sutton

Ever have occasion to do an in-depth review of the academic and practical literature on leadership? I have — twice in the past five years

 

Openness or How Do You Design for the Loss of Control? By Tim Leberecht via Ralph-Ohr

Openness is the mega-trend for innovation in the 21st century, and it remains the topic du jour for businesses of all kinds. Granted, it has been on the agenda of every executive ever since Henry Chesbrough’s seminal Open Innovation came out in 2003.

Which Part of Your Business Model is Creating Value? By Tim Kastelle

Andrew Keen posted a fascinating interview with Jeff Jarvis yesterday. All of the interview clips are worth watching – they touch on a number of interesting topics, including the relative benefits of publicness and privacy, the future of news and how to best develop new business models for journalism, why google struggles with social applications, and the changing nature of internet-based business models. The latter is included in this clip:

Strategy starts with identifying changes by Jorge Barba

Pay attention to this McKinsey Quarterly interview of Richard Rumelt, professor of strategy at UCLA’s Anderson School of Management:

Smartfailing – a new concept for learning through failure by Stefan Lindegaard

We need to become better at learning through failure, but the word failure itself is so negatively loaded. How can we create a new concept and vocabulary on the intersection of failure and learning?

The efficient use of ideas by Jeffrey Phillips

Every significant “leap forward” in the span of human consciousness has coincided with a significant change in the efficient use of a significant resource.  For example – the transition from nomadic life to farming.

Ideas Jam – How it works by Paul Sloane

We ran the Ideas Jam meeting yesterday and it went well. It was an intensive idea generation session.

Creativity Matters by John Maeda

Last month when Newsweek [07.19.10] ran a piece on how to fix the “Creativity Crisis” in America, the mainstream media brought to light critical issues that are routinely ignored in the U.S. today

How to Find Opportunities in Fragmentation by Andrea Meyer

Point: If you’re looking for a new business opportunity, look for individually-fragmented but collectively large areas of economic activity, such as where individuals or small business own a large segment of the market

Enjoy it!

A good week! Great readings! »:-)

26 de Junho de 2010

To read is fun and makes me think!

 

6 Tips for Open Collaboration by Venessa Miemis

This is a crosspost from Alpha Lo’s blog, Open Collaboration. Though he had a much catchier title for the post (“What I Learned From Venessa Miemis” – ha), I thought he did a great job listing some of the attitudes and behaviors helpful when trying to extend oneself, collaborate, and evolve. Alpha’s doing some amazing work in creating gift circles on the west coast. Check out the original post and comments here.]

 

Design Thinking in Stereo: Martin and Brown by Paula Thornton

  

When the topic of “design thinking” had gained enough momentum for BusinessWeek to devote an entire issue to design in 2004, it was a siren song to me. Newly converted, I digested everything I could find. Design thinking seemed to cover most of the experiential clues I’d been collecting as the means to improve business potential.

Innovation Is All About Behaviors by Stefan Lindegaard

I just read an interesting article in the Wall Street Journal on how the video game industry prepares to launch new technology-based developments such as new motion-based controllers.

 

Big Pharma Goes Beyond the Blues by Mitch Ditkoff

… The concept was a simple one: help organizations increase teamwork and decrease complaint by getting employees to write and perform original blues songs.

Data-rich, Discovery Poor: Pharma Looks to “Pre-Competitive” Collaborations by Deborah Goldgaber

On the 10th year anniversary of the Human Genome Project it’s been re-marked that, while undeniably a huge scientific achievement, results have fallen far short of expectations.

How Xerox Monetizes Non-Core Innovation by Andrea Meyer

Story:
Ursula Burns, CEO of Xerox, discussed innovation at her company in an interview at the World Innovation Forum June 9, 2010. She described initiatives to improve the return on innovation at Xerox’s  research centers such as PARC (Palo Alto Research Center). PARC’s ground-breaking inventions like the graphical user interface, ethernet, and postscript as inventions  had a large impact on the world but didn’t contribute enough to Xerox’s bottom line.  Let’s look at why that happened and what Xerox is doing now.

Why purpose matters by Jorge Barba

A big part of strategy making is differentiating your business from others, being able to help people notice what’s different between your product or service and mine. In the beginning of the movie Dark Night when Batman has just fought off Scarecrow and a group of Batman wannabes an interesting conversation takes place:

The future of marketing – changing the game and playing field by wimrampen via Ralph Ohr

How can Service Dominant Logic and its “value in use” mindset be helpful to rethink your marketing goals and approaches?

Enjoy it!

Some great readings in the last days…

12 de Junho de 2010

Enjoy it!

 

The Power of Meaning by Ralph-Christian Ohr

About one year ago, I started engaging in discussions on ‘innovation’ via Twitter. As a physicist, used to work in product/innovation management for technology-based companies, my understanding of innovation was: creating value for the customer by leveraging technology development. As innovation is accomplished by people for people – companies are eventually run by people – I had a suspicion, though, that human nature is likely to play an important role in the innovation process.

MinuteClinic’s Service Design Innovation by Andrea Meyer

Story: Some of the best innovations are brilliant in their after-the-fact simplicity. Take MinuteClinic.  We all know “an ounce of prevention…” yet most of us still don’t go to the doctor for preventative care because of the cumbersome process of a office visit: scheduling an appointment, taking time off work, waiting in the doctor’s office for unknown amounts of time, sitting in the midst of other hacking/sneezing people, and being unsure how much the visit will cost

WORLD INNOVATION FORUM 2010 by Mitch Ditkoff

I just returned from the World Innovation Forum in NYC.

My big insight? Thought leaders will soon be a thing of the past.

In their place? Feeling leaders — business savants who have made the journey from head to heart and aren’t afraid to let the rest of us know what they’ve learned along the way.

 

The Limitations of Open Innovation by Stefan Lindegaard

…often lie in the minds of people. I had an interesting workshop this week working with one of the leading gaming companies and I was once again reminded on the limitations set by imagination.

The power of bringing in an outsider for #innovation by Jorge Barba

Nilofer Merchant, CEO of Rubicon Consulting, argues that if organizations want to be innovative they should stop hiring the same type of people just to meet the requirements of the job position:

It seems to me we ought to also know how to get diverse points of view into the system, because that is what allows us to see things from different angles and fundamentally shift our approach from seeing the problem the way it’s always been seen (and thus unsolved, one could presume) and see it afresh to create the shift in viewpoint that allows for a new creative act.

‘Oops! I’m deviating from the group; I have to do something about it!’ Rotterdam School  Via @ariegoldshlager

Rotterdam/Nijmegen, 15 January 2008 — A team of researchers from the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University has conducted an unprecedented experiment that reveals what brain processes are involved in social conformism. It is a well-known fact that people have a tendency to adjust their opinions to those held by others

Biz 2.0: Orchestrated Improvisation by Paula Thornton

Reading Andy McAfee’s recent piece “IT’s Three Key Organizational Transformations”, spurred a personal thinking theme today. I was a bit disturbed (and disappointed) by what Andy seemed to miss in his thought — stuff that 2.0 thinking hinges on (but it wouldn’t be the first time, or likely the last).

Innovation & Correspondence Bias – Misunderstanding motivation misreads meaning by Andrew (Drew)

The more we learn about the individual and social psychology misunderstandings at play in organization life, specifically in the development of innovations, the harder it is to identify clear and unambiguous actions we can take to address them. We must become adept at inquiry, observation, exploration and reflection – any of which might be effectively preceded by the word “self”. Thankfully these are prerequisites for effective innovation which makes for some strong synergies if we can apply the skills effectively.

Thanks for reading this! There are a lot more! Tell me your preferences!

Very good readings this week

18 de Abril de 2010

Inspiring and learning from…

 

How to Avoid Open Innovation Frustration by Stefan Lindegaard

I recently wrote a post on the frustration that often comes with open innovation. This prompted many comments here and on LinkedIn. I found many great insights and I want to share of few of these with you in this post:

Innovation: Concentrate on People and Process, not Tools by Tim Kastelle

Imagine that you are a unit manager in an organisation, and your CEO comes to you and says: “We need to be more innovative – you’re in charge of making that happen.” What’s the first thing you should start thinking about?

Open innovation is coming of age by Victor Keegan

Formula 1 has been at the awesome edge of innovation for decades, yet most of the time you would have been pushed to find the fruits of its research adopted elsewhere. Not any more.

10 Basic Principles of Innovation by Erica Templeman

Today’s post is from Matthew Greeley, Founder and CEO of Brightidea, the global leader in On-Demand Innovation Management software. Prior to founding Brightidea, Matthew consulted for Wrenchead.com, helping them raise over $100 million in venture funding from investors.  He holds a degree in Computer Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology and studied Creativity and Marketing at Stanford University. In addition to his role at Brightidea, Matthew sits on the board of directors of ClearDay Technologies.

 

The Myths About Design Thinking And How You Can Find Out If You Are Truly An Integrative Thinker. Take The Test Now. And Yes, We Are Hiring! by Idris Mootee

These days I am getting a little bothered with the phrase “design thinking”. There is a lot causal misuse but the phrase has gained popularity and currency because it is new, it gives designers new status and it helps to push design firm upstream and hopefully they can solve bigger problems with design ideas.

 

Innovation Strategies Combined by By  Frank T. Rothaermel and Andrew M. Hess

Continuous innovation is the engine that drives highly successful companies such as Apple, General Electric, Google, Honda, Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft, Procter & Gamble, Sony, Tata group and many others. Innovation is an especially potent competitive weapon in tough economic times because it allows companies to redefine the marketplace in their favor and achieve much-needed growth

After Eureka: 7 questions to test innovation for profit potential By Simon Kirby

Analytical strategic frameworks are not the key to creating transformative innovation, a point wonderfully made by Seth Godin:

Irrational passion is the key change agent of our economy.”

How to Measure Open Innovation Value – Part 2 in 100open

What’s Different about Open Innovation?

Better Value

The metrics are less developed in this emerging discipline than in traditional innovation. In my last blog  I outlined a list of the sorts of direct and indirect measures that firms can use to capture all the value that innovation brings.

What is “innovation”? by Joel West

Sunday night, as I waited for feedback on a draft chapter about open innovation — part of a volume on innovation for the Wiley Encyclpedia of Marketing — I saw an interesting headline on the Wall Street Journal website:

 

Mayo Clinic: Effective Word-Of-Mouth by Andrea Meyer

Story: The Mayo Clinic is known around the world for reputable, high-quality health care. How can the company extend and expand this good word of mouth? Seth Godin provided an insightful answer during his Online Marketing Innovation Q&A, April 15, 2010 hosted by HSMAmericas.

 What do you suggest?

Have a nice week!

Some very special readings this week

3 de Abril de 2010

Those are special to me! And to you? Take a look!

The Rising Underemployment Rate and its Emotional Impact by Steve Nguyen

In a previous post called The Cost of Unemployment, I wrote about the toll, on health and well-being, that unemployment had on people.

One aspect of unemployment that rarely gets mentioned is underemployment. Gallup defines underemployment as people who are “unemployed or working part-time but wanting full-time work” (Jacobe, 2010, para. 3). According to the latest Gallup poll, the underemployment rate is at a staggering 20% as of March 15, 2010, compared to the 9.7% unemployment rate reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

#Innovation = changing things by Jorge Barba

When I was younger and went with my parents to all family get togethers all the grown ups would sit at a table and talk/rant about politics (you get the picture!). My mom would ask me why I didn’t go and sit with my dad so that I could learn something, to which my response was:

Open Innovation Perspectives for Executives, Innovation Leaders and Employees by Stefan Lindegaard

As I prepare for a couple of workshops in the coming weeks, I have the opportunity to think about how to prepare different messages for three different groups of stakeholders within a company; executives, innovation leaders and other employees working with innovation.

 

Preparing for the Unknown by Andrea Meyer

Story: What will the web look like in 20 years? Stuart Miniman of the Office of the CTO at EMC Corporation asked me to contribute my thoughts on this, as part of EMC’s ON magazine celebration of the web’s 20th anniversary.

 

The Art of Good Decision Making by Mitch Ditkoff

What follows is the second in a series of postings by leadership maven, Barry Gruenberg, the newest member of the Idea Champions team.

 

The Law of Attraction is a Dangerous Delusion by Paul Sloane

One of the biggest bandwagons that has rolled through the self-help community in recent years is the so-called Law of Attraction (LoA). This claims that you attract into your life whatever you think about.  Before I explain why I believe that this is not a law, not true, and not helpful, let me differentiate the LoA from some associated but different self-help concepts that actually do work.

How You Define a Problem Determines if You Can Solve It by Tim Kastelle

How we define things is incredibly important. I’ve been reminded of this almost constantly this week. Here are some examples:

  • I was talking with a friend of mine over the weekend about using social media to improve the flow of ideas within an organisation. She is a high-ranking manager in a very large organisation, and she was curious to hear about this blog, and about how John and I have used it as a communication tool

 

Design Thinking: Everywhere and Nowhere,… by Kevin McCullagh

It’s a sign of the times when The Economist, the house journal of the global business elite, holds a conference in London on ‘design thinking’ (official Big Rethink site here). Having attended the conference, produced in association with The Design Council and held over 11-12 March, I was left wondering one thing: why is design thinking such a hot topic with business leaders, given that it leaves so many designers cold?

Thinking About Open Design  By Roland Harwood and David Simoes-Brown

“Open-source software is one thing, but would you fly in an open-source aircraft?”

This question was posed late last year at a gathering of senior design professionals in London. It was couched as a counterargument to the rise of open design and such companies as 99 designs and Quirky that offer low-cost, crowd-sourced design.

Good readings! Have a nice weekend!

Great Readings this week

27 de Março de 2010

Ideas and Knowledge!

 

Enjoy it!

 

Call for Visionaries! Help Make the Future of Innovation Open and Global – by Stefan Lindegaard – 15inno

“Can you imagine a global network of people who believe the future of innovation is open and global?

Can you imagine a global network based on regional chapters that helps increase the general awareness of open innovation and connects the people and companies – virtually and physically – that turn open innovation into reality?”

Putting in the Hours – by Tim Kastelle – Innovation Leadership Network

“We can’t assume that they already know how great our idea is, or that the value in it is self-evident. This is a particularly important lesson if we are trying to cross domains. If you are a lab scientist trying to commercialise your great discovery, out in business your reputation starts at 0, no matter how much reknown you’re held in as a scientist.”

 

Avoiding Innovation Chaos inside Companies – by Hutch Carpenter – spigit

“Great news…you’ve established your innovation platform to solicit ideas, and gosh, did you get them! Hundreds of ideas. Wow!

Now what? ”

 

Genius Transparency to Lead Innovation – with Ellen Weber – Brain Leaders and Learners

Flawed leadership, whether called democracy or dictatorship generates  gridlocks that block creative brainpower.

 

A Small Attempt to Model Organizational Evolution – by Thierry de Baillon – Sonnez en cas d’absence

“Last few months were, for me, pretty insightful. I tried to spread and nurture some ideas about organizations, collaboration and complexity, met people, chatted online with others, read, assisted or talked at events…  The last pebbles of wisdom came for The Age of Paradox, from Charles Handy, whose S-curve metaphor quasi magically fitted my intuitions. Little by little, I have now built a somehow practical model of organizational maturity which drastically shows the need for enterprise to step into the 2.0 world.”

 

Innovation is a habit – by Jorge Barba – Game-Changer

“Act different to think different. Easier said than done right? The truth is we’ve already been-there-done-that when we were kids, we just forget we did it. How is this possible? How is it that we lost that inquisitive mind? We just lost our imagination, threw the crayons away and got caught up in the reality of the adult world that’s what happened.”

Creating An Emotional Response From Your Web Site – by Kim Krause Berg – search engine land

“I hadn’t seen my artist friend in nearly a year, nor was I even sure he was still painting. But there I was the other day, standing with him in his art studio, chatting about the new things he wanted me to add to his web site. Suddenly he led me to one large 80” x 64” canvas of swirling brush strokes that is his style. “This one is for you,” he announced, “for all the help you’ve given me with the web site.”

Open Innovation becoming an established part of the culture – by business reporting – SCIENCE BUSINESS

“The culture of Open Innovation is becoming established and its potential benefits are now widely recognised according to a survey of R&D directors in the world’s 30 largest healthcare and manufacturing companies, carried out by the UK consultancy group PA Consulting.”

Reverse Innovation: How Designing for Emerging Economies Brings Benefits Back Home – by Andrea Meyer – Working Knowledge

“Story: GE Healthcare sells sophisticated medical imaging devices around the world. Historically, they have sold these high-end machines in emerging economies like India. But only 10% of Indian hospitals can afford a $10,000 ECG machine. Reaching the other 90% of the market takes more than simply cutting a few costs. It requires radical innovation and an in-depth understanding of local conditions.”

 

WHAT, HOW & WHY? – by   Nicolae Halmaghi – Design Thinking Exchange

“What Exactly is Design Thinking?

What Does it Do?

How and Why Does it Create Value?

At this point it is a losing battle trying to find a unified voice about what Design Thinking does, or means. Most definitions are confusing, cumbersome, incomplete, make little sense, or have purely and simply nothing to do with Design Thinking. There is a big disconnect between the way the design community feels and interprets DT and the way business strategists define it. As more and more consultancies want to take advantage of the media attention dedicated to DT, it is likely that unless a common definition is adopted soon, the term will be polluted permanently.”

Have a nice day!